Strays and Wildlife Care

Please find below some useful information and
contact details regarding strays and wildlife care.

Stray dogs

During practice opening hours we can scan a stray dog for a microchip and try to locate an owner.

Please note it is a legal requirement for all dogs in public places to wear a collar with the name and address of the owner (The Control of Dogs Order 1992), and as of April 6th 2016 it will be compulsory for all dogs to be microchipped. It’s important that the relevant microchip database is notified of any changes in address, telephone number or ownership. If you need to update these details we can provide you with the relevant contact details.

The council is responsible for stray dogs. They can be reached at the following numbers:

South Northants Council: 01327 322323    Out of Hours: 0800 160 1022

Stray cats

Stray cats will often have a home locally so it is advisable to ask around the neighbourhood. During practice opening hours we can scan a stray cat for a microchip and try to locate an owner. If no microchip is found and the cat is healthy we will often advise taking the cat back to where it was found, as it will often have a home locally.

Ill or injured stray animals

If a stray animal is ill or injured we will provide emergency treatment and hospitalisation as necessary and try to locate an owner.

Wildlife care

What to do if you find a wild animal that may be sick or injured.

  • Observe from a distance: Many wild animals that are brought in are neither sick nor injured. Young animals may seem abandoned but the parents are often nearby but won’t return whilst people are nearby. Young birds for example that have just left the nest may look ill and will sit under bushes for 1-2 weeks while learning to fly while the parents continue to feed them. Therefore initial advice is to observe from a distance.
  • If after observing from a distance the animal seems ill or injured it may need veterinary attention: You should first contact the RSPCA on 0300 1234 999 who will advise you on the best course of action. They may advise you to safely catch the animal and take it to your nearest vet. If they provide you with an incident log number please provide this to the veterinary practice.
  • Take care when catching wildlife: Many wild injured animals will bite when cornered or threatened. Contain small garden birds in a strong cardboard box that can be closed securely and make numerous small air holes. For other animals please seek advice on safe capture from the RSPCA who may send out an inspector if appropriate. If after catching the animal you no longer think it is sick or injured then release it.
  • We are happy to provide free emergency treatment for wildlife during normal working hours: Unfortunately we do not have the specialist facilities or equipment to hospitalise and provide on-going treatment. If we admit any injured wildlife for treatment we may ask for your help in returning it to where it was initially found, or for help transferring the animal to an appropriate rescue centre. The decision on whether to treat or euthanize an a wild animal is based not only on whether the condition is treatable, but also on whether the animal will be able to make a full recovery and be able to support itself in the wild. There are many conditions that, although treatable in a pet, would prevent a wild animal from competing and acquiring food.

For more information please see the following RSPCA sites:

HedgehogWe’ve also put together some information on Autumn Juvenile Hedgehogs – small hedgehogs who may not be able to safely hibernate throughout Winter – with some advice on what we can all do to help them out. To download the Autumn Juvenile Hedgehogs hand-out click here and for more information on hedgehog conservation visit www.sttiggywinkles.org.uk/top-navigation/wildlife-advice/hedgehog-fact-sheet.html.

We’re here to help

If you have any queries about stray cats or dogs or need any advice on wildlife care, were happy to help.

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